How to Keep a Workout Routine.

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Most people who love to exercise have discipline, but they also practice giving themselves a bit of space. Their commitment to exercise is a lifestyle, but at the same time, they allow some slack in case of any obstacles they may face in getting to the gym at times.

If people are rigid with their fitness, they have a limit they come up against and burn out. The same thing with a strict diet, sooner or later the urge to cheat takes over and may destroy all the hard work.

The best thing to do is have a fitness plan and keep it moderate; it’s about making it work over the course of a lifetime, not just the short term.

Individuals can give themselves a certain number of days they want to workout a week.  For optimal results, they should commit to somewhere between 3-6 times a week. If they show up most weeks for their committed workouts, but miss a workout here or there, their world doesn’t fall apart.

It’s getting back in the saddle on the next one. Keeping fitness simple and manageable in the scope of one’s life, makes it easier to continue doing in the long run.

 

 


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How much does sleep have to do with weight?

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According to a study, all of our internal organs have a clock, which is based in our cells. Apparently, by keeping a regular schedule of eating and sleeping , our clocks stay in alignment.

When we change our sleeping or eating patterns, by getting less sleep because of let’s say work or we travel to a different time zone, our body has to adjust. But, in the short term it creates havoc on our system. Our blood pressure goes up, blood sugar dips and our hunger hormones are out of sync. If it continues over the long run, it can set us up for weight gain and diseases such as Diabetes.

An example given in a recent article on NPR, cited as an example:

So consider what happens, for instance, if we eat late or in the middle of the night. The master clock — which is set by the light-dark cycle — is cueing all other clocks in the body that it’s night. Time to rest.

“The clock in the brain is sending signals saying: Do not eat, do not eat!” says Turek.

But when we override this signal and eat anyway, the clock in the pancreas, for instance, has to start releasing insulin to deal with the meal. And, research suggests, this late-night munching may start to reset the clock in the organ. The result? Competing time cues.

Results of a recent weight-loss study, in which timing of meals shows how it influences the amount of weight people lose was reported in the International Journal of Obesity. It showed that if people ate their main meal earlier in the day, they were more successful at weight loss.

Beyond weight management, the clocks in our bodies, which monitor our different organs are affected by of our sleeping, eating and activities — so to maintain good health, we need to be aware of our natural rhythm and pay attention to its signals.


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